Customer Reviews:
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4
Laughed so hard I cried
Laughed so hard I cried
2
Recycle that, would see again
Recycle that, would see again
2
Greatest of all time
Greatest of all time
1
Sexy fringe show
Sexy fringe show
1
No idea what I just saw
No idea what I just saw
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No idea what I just saw
“No idea what I just saw”
Total confusion, noisy people talking over host. Very disappointed
Reviewed by Richard A.
13 February 2022
Greatest of all time
“Greatest of all time”
Funniest show at Fringe!
Reviewed by Kita A.
12 February 2022
See all customer reviews for The Confessional
Reviewed by: Fringefeed
Review by Jessie Hiscox | 21 January 2022

Comedy shows are often a daunting affair for your everyday audience member. The thought of sitting through a performance where you may be singled out, embarrassed, or forced to pity-laugh at unfunny jokes is enough to discourage anyone from attending such an affair.

The Confessional, however, is not like the rest. The show’s premise consists of audience members writing and submitting anonymous confessions that are used to fuel the improvised, and hilarious, content of the show. Comedians Daniel Delby and Cameron McLaren are exceptionally quick-witted, masterfully weaving the audience confessions with their own, ensuring that no-one feels ashamed or uncomfortable with the secret they have chosen to share.

The confessions themselves range from tame, cute secrets- like not knowing Victoria was an Australian State, to secrets that are a little too wild to type out in a Fringefeed review. Daniel and Cameron, however, have an unmatched ability at making you feel like every secret is worthy of acceptance and mercy, encouraging audience members to take ownership of their ‘sins’ and be rewarded with a shot of goon and some chocolate.

It would be obvious to anyone watching Delby and McLaren interact that their friendship extends beyond a mere professional partnership. They understand each other’s rhythm and sense of humour, finding balance between poking fun and supporting every gag and punchline, leaving the audience wondering how a pair of comedians can possibly improvise such a seamless and clever 50-minute performance. From the moment you walk in, Delby and McLaren are warm and welcoming, transforming a crowd of strangers into an intimate gathering of friends. Whilst it is admittedly strange, being let-in to some people’s deepest and darkest unspoken confessions, it is also unexpectedly empowering. Where else are we able to share our embarrassing stories and have them received with such understanding and forgiveness?

This, perhaps, is The Confessional’s greatest strength- it inspires the audience to laugh at themselves and others, breaking the norm of individual spectatorship and making audience-members feel like they are truly part of the performance. Forget going to church- The Confessional is the unanimously more entertaining alternative for confessing your sins.