Customer Reviews:
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Recycle that, would see again
Recycle that, would see again
2
Greatest of all time
Greatest of all time
1
Emotional roller-coaster
Emotional roller-coaster
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Recycle that, would see again
“Recycle that, would see again”
a loose comedy surrounded by the delight of jazz and the stories of a musician well versed in his field. Would love to know more about his career and see more of his performances!
Reviewed by George B.
20 January 2022
Recycle that, would see again
“Recycle that, would see again”
This show is perfect to unwind to, it’ll have you laughing at the jokes and anecdotes told between performances and grooving along to some familiar tunes
Reviewed by Keiran H.
19 January 2022
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Reviewed by: Fringefeed
Review by Emily Smith | 19 January 2022

Do your ears a favour and treat them to the sensational sounds of SAXOLOGY. 

Over the hour under sensual nightclub lighting at the Girls School, Serge Le Goueff alternated between crooning jazz numbers and telling jokes and anecdotes about life as a touring musician. I'm not sure which was more pleasing to listen to, his silky singing voice, or his delightful French accent. I could listen to Serge read the terms and conditions and still be enraptured. 

Each song featured a different instrument from his collection of a saxophone, clarinet, flute, and what he had to tell us is a soprano, not the 'clariflute' which was my guess. Serge crooned recognisable classics of Frank Sinatra and Louis Armstrong, as well as some less well-known tunes, showcasing his incredible talent across the four instruments and on the microphone.

My surprising favourite was actually the French jazz, which, while dredging up some uncomfortable memories of WACE French, got me toe-tapping along. And it got the tick of approval from the jazz musician I took with me, so I feel justified in my praise. 

Though a few of Serge's jokes I recognised from viral internet posts, and his delivery wasn't that of a seasoned stand-up comedian, he shined in his personal anecdotes. Expanding further into the trials and tribulations of the touring musician could take the show from good to great. Next year I hope to hear more about the saxophonist's need to learn the clarinet in five days, and his realisation that the seemingly unheard-of band he opened for in Japan was actually the Japanese equivalent of ACDC. 

SAXOLOGY is not a show aimed exclusively at die-hard jazz fans, but rather those looking for an ear-soothing night of great musical talent and sensual microphone leans.