Customer Reviews:
2 reactions
21
Emotional roller-coaster
Emotional roller-coaster
10
Greatest of all time
Greatest of all time
3
Laughed so hard I cried
Laughed so hard I cried
3
Recycle that, would see again
Recycle that, would see again
See all customer reviews
Greatest of all time
“Greatest of all time”
Tears of laughter and sadness and more laughter. Hits real deep but in a very good way.
Reviewed by Ristch C.
17 February 2022
Emotional roller-coaster
“Emotional roller-coaster”
I had trouble keeping up sometimes. I wasn't sure if it was meant to be like the Denis Leary standup style in No Cure For Cancer where he rockets along at breakneck speed, super frustrated at a world that rewards apathy? Thank you for sharing your story with us Colin. Keep healin
Reviewed by Lima L.
14 February 2022
See all customer reviews for Me, My Cult and I
Reviewed by: Fringefeed
Review by Elena Perse | 15 January 2022

Let’s be real: there’s not many of us out there that aren’t at least a little bit intrigued by cults. With the rise of mainstream interest in true crime, it’s safe to say that cults are having a bit of a moment. Colin Ebsworth starts his show Me, My Cult and I by asking the audience to name their favourite cults, with answers ranging from Jonestown to the Manson Family. Whether you call it morbid curiosity or just nosiness, we all want to know a little more about what a cult is really like, and Ebsworth, who was raised in the cult of the Unification Church, has the inside scoop. It’s not necessarily everything that you would expect, though.

Part stand-up comedy, part TED talk, Me, My Cult and I is an entertaining, fascinating and, at times, heartbreaking exploration of what it’s like to grow up as part of a cult. Looking back through the history of the Unification Church (AKA the Moonies), Ebsworth spices up what could otherwise become a dry history lesson with tales of his parents’ exploits, family sing-a-longs and, heralded by an air horn, the “crazy sex parts” of being in a cult.

Ebsworth’s unique, personal angle and his quick, dry humour make for a great show, filled with bizarre pieces of info about the cult, and a bit of social commentary thrown in for good measure. You’ll absolutely come out of Me My Cult and I with a wealth of new knowledge about the Moonies, but Ebsworth’s entertaining performance keeps the show from feeling like a lecture.

It is worth noting that this show does contain some heavy material, at times touching on topics like mental illness and suicide, so if you’re after exclusively light-hearted laughs, Me My Cult and I might not be the show for you. However, Ebsworth’s heartfelt and emotional portrayal of the reality of his family’s experiences in the Unification Church adds genuine depth to the show.

For a hilarious and illuminating insight into life in a cult, Me My Cult and I is not to be missed!